Home » The Space Trilogy: Space Trilogy Books, Space Trilogy Characters, Space Trilogy Locations, That Hideous Strength, Out of the Silent Planet by Books LLC
The Space Trilogy: Space Trilogy Books, Space Trilogy Characters, Space Trilogy Locations, That Hideous Strength, Out of the Silent Planet Books LLC

The Space Trilogy: Space Trilogy Books, Space Trilogy Characters, Space Trilogy Locations, That Hideous Strength, Out of the Silent Planet

Books LLC

Published June 12th 2010
ISBN : 9781158032136
Paperback
74 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Space Trilogy Books, Space Trilogy Characters, Space TrilogyMorePurchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Space Trilogy Books, Space Trilogy Characters, Space Trilogy Locations, That Hideous Strength, Out of the Silent Planet, the Dark Tower, Perelandra, Elwin Ransom, Professor Weston, Field of Arbol, Lord Feverstone, University of Edgestow, Old Solar, Malacandra. Excerpt: That Hideous Strength (subtitled A Modern Fairy-Tale for Grown-Ups) is a 1945 novel by C. S. Lewis, the final book in Lewiss theological science fiction Space Trilogy. The events of this novel follow those of Out of the Silent Planet and Perelandra (a.k.a. Voyage to Venus) and once again feature the philologist Elwin Ransom. Yet, unlike the principal events of those two novels, the story takes place on Earth rather than in space or on other planets in the solar system. The novel was heavily influenced by the writing of Lewiss friend Charles Williams and is markedly dystopian in style. In the books preface Lewis acknowledges the science-fiction writer Olaf Stapledon and his work: Mr. Stapledon is so rich in invention that he can well afford to lend, and I admire his invention (though not his philosophy) so much that I should feel no shame to borrow. The title is taken from a poem written by David Lyndsay in 1555,, also known as The Monarche. The couplet in question,, refers to the Tower of Babel. The story is set in England of the mid 1940s (vaguely after the war), in the small university town of Edgestow, centered around a young university don Mark Studdock, a fellow of Bracton College at the (fictional) University of Edgestow, and his wife Jane (ne Tudor), who is working on her graduate degree in poetry. The National Institute of Coordinated Experiments (N.I.C.E.), a scientific and social planning agency, furtively pursues its program of the exploitation of natu... More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=205004